剑桥工作室_澳门赌场 //www.studiocambridge.co.uk English in England Tue, 21 Apr 2020 13:24:37 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 //wordpress.org/?v=5.3.4 //www.sosoele.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/cropped-site-icon-32x32.png Studio Cambridge //www.studiocambridge.co.uk 32 32 How to keep up your English language learning when you’re stuck at home //www.sosoele.com/how-to-keep-up-english-learning-at-home/ Wed, 25 Mar 2020 15:12:09 +0000 //www.sosoele.com/?p=5665 How to keep up your English language learning when you’re stuck at home Hello again...

The post How to keep up your English language learning when you’re stuck at home appeared first on Studio Cambridge.

]]>
How to keep up your English language learning when you’re stuck at home

Hello again from all of us at Studio Cambridge! We hope you’re safe and well in these challenging and unusual circumstances.

The best way to learn – English in England

Here at Studio, our business is teaching English to students from all over the world. It’s best to do this as part of an immersive language experience. This is why our courses have always been based in the UK – so you can learn English in England.

Further, we have prided ourselves on facilitating your English language experience through cultural enrichment in Cambridge.

There really is no substitute for staying in the academic heart of England with a welcoming British host family. In fact, you can book your immersive language stay for 2021 right here. However, when circumstances prevent you from taking the travel trip of your dreams, you still need a way to sharpen your language skills.

English student sits at a desk taking notes from their laptop with their phone beside them

How can we keep feeding our desire to learn?

This is why we’re proud to announce the English for Life courses 2.0. These courses are online-based so that you can study from the comfort of your bedroom. Yet they retain all the benefits of our commitment to learning English by using it – our students will be taught through video chat with their peers and teachers. And class sizes are still small – only 8 students in each video session!

Not only is this a great opportunity to brush up on your language skills, it’s a great way of socialising when you’re stuck inside!

We’re offering 6 hours of tuition for 60 GBP per week, 7.5 hours of tuition for 70 GBP per week, 15 hours of tuition for 120 GBP per week and 21 hours per week for 168 GBP per week – a huge discount from our traditional courses! You will also be able to book one-to-one English lessons. Check the handy table below to get a course breakdown.

CourseHours of tuition per weekPrice per weekLesson times
EFL Online6 hours
7.5 hours
15 hours
60 GBP
70 GBP
120 GBP
13:45 – 15:15
09:15 – 10 45 /11:15 – 12:45
09:15 – 10 45
11:15 – 12:45
EFL-28 Online21 hours168 GBP09:15 – 10:45
11:15 – 12:45
13:45 – 15:15 (no afternoon lesson on Fridays)
Private tuition onlineBooked in hourly blocks36 GBP per hourTo be arranged with teacher

How does online tuition work?

If you’re not confident with technology, online classes can be daunting. To alleviate any fears you may have, we will walk you through the process when you enrol. But for a quick overview …

Walk-through

Students using their tablets or computers will be sent a link for the program Zoom via email. When you click on the link, Zoom will download automatically. Please note that all students should have a working webcam and should turn it on during lessons.

If you’d like to attend online lessons on your phone, you can download the Zoom app from Google Play or Apple. Students attending via their phones should also download the BBC Learning English App.

In order to ensure we place you in the class best suited to you, we ask that you take an online test 2 or 3 days in advance. We’ll give you the link and the password for this on enrolment.

For one-to-one teaching, we will require at least one working day’s notice to match you with one of our teachers.

We hope these new programmes excite you as much as they excite us – and we look forward to continuing study with you! Contact us to engage with people from all over the world interested in learning English.

The post How to keep up your English language learning when you’re stuck at home appeared first on Studio Cambridge.

]]>
Cambridge in bloom //www.sosoele.com/cambridge-in-bloom/ Wed, 04 Mar 2020 12:15:00 +0000 //www.sosoele.com/?p=5630 Cambridge in bloom Welcome back to our monthly #WelfareWednesday blog! As winter draws to a...

The post Cambridge in bloom appeared first on Studio Cambridge.

]]>
Cambridge in bloom

Welcome back to our monthly #WelfareWednesday blog! As winter draws to a close and spring approaches, I’m thinking about how the environment impacts our mental health.

Cambridge is beautiful all year round. However, over the next few months, the floral scene around the city is guaranteed to be quite extraordinary. During your time here in Cambridge, we highly recommend a visit to the Cambridge University Botanic Garden. Whatever season it may be, you’re sure to be in for a treat!

The Botanic Gardens in Cambridge

The original Botanic Garden of Cambridge was founded in 1762. Originally, its purpose was to grow plants used for teaching medical students at the University of Cambridge. Now, it’s a popular attraction both with those local to Cambridge and those visiting.

The snow drops are already in full bloom in the Cambridge Botanic Garden. Our Sir George students captured some wonderful photos recently during their Friday afternoon visit.

A large magenta flower with purple stamen hanging over bed of greenery in Cambridge University Botanic Gardens, which Sir George students at Studio Cambridge English Language school visited as an enrichment activity.

The garden showcased the famous Snowdrop Trail throughout February and attracted thousands of visitors. Interestingly, there are 39 different species of snowdrop. From ‘Grumpy’ to ‘Octopussy’, there are hundreds of named snowdrop cultivars. Their names often reflect floral features, or special people or places.

Springtime flowers

Spring has sprung particularly early in Cambridge this year. As well as the delightful purple crocus flower, stunning daffodils have been popping up all around the city. Seeing daffodils out and about really does take me back to that wonderful poem I learnt at school, Daffodils by William Wordsworth, 1804.

When you visit Cambridge, you may like to have a wander to the Mill Pond, where you can see Darwin College across the river. This is one of Cambridge’s postgraduate colleges. I got a photo of a swarm of purple crocuses just recently – it really was a sight not to be missed!

A swarm of budding purple crocuses on a lawn, taken from ground level by Amy, Head of Welfare at Studio Cambridge.

Charles Darwin and Botany in Cambridge

Fact: 

Charles Darwin was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He was an undergraduate at the University of Cambridge and Darwin College is named after his family!

During his famous voyage on the Beagle, he regularly sent back specimens to his old teacher, Professor Henslow. Some of these specimens, including some of the famous Galapagos finches, found their way to the University Museum of Zoology.

The Correspondence of Charles of Darwin is part of the volume containing letters written by Darwin as part of his work communicating with other naturalist in many fields and in all quarters of the globe.

Did you know?

Although his voyage to the Galapagos and his work with finches were important parts of his work, at heart, Darwin was a botanist: an expert in or of the scientific study of plants.

Flowers and well-being

How’s all this relevant to welfare?

I’ve been reading lots this month about the positive impacts that flowers and greenery could have on our health and general well-being.

Going for a walk or treating yourself to a bunch of flowers for your home could really have a positive impact on your mood. Further, it could help reduce stress and help you find peace of mind.

I always like to have a bunch of flowers at home in a vase. It brightens up the room and creates a happy, positive environment.  

Flowers always make people better, happier, and more helpful; they are sunshine, food and medicine for the soul.

Luther Burbank, American botanist, horticulturist, and pioneer in agricultural science

This quote by Luther Burbank really sums up my feelings – flowers are always a positive for students! It’s one of the reasons we make sure to visit the many areas of natural beauty in Cambridge as part of our activities programme. We are truly blessed to be based in such a beautiful city.

See you all next month! And take the words of Walt Whitman to heart as you study:

Give me odorous at sunrise a garden of beautiful flowers where I can walk undisturbed.

‘Give Me the Splendid, Silent Sun’, Walt Whitman, 1787 – 1900

Take time to enjoy the floral scene around the city and maximise your learning potential.

Lots of love,

Amy xx

The post Cambridge in bloom appeared first on Studio Cambridge.

]]>
It’s the beginning of Lent! //www.sosoele.com/its-the-beginning-of-lent/ Wed, 26 Feb 2020 16:30:00 +0000 //www.sosoele.com/?p=5608 It’s the beginning of Lent! Today is Ash Wednesday, and marks for many British people...

The post It’s the beginning of Lent! appeared first on Studio Cambridge.

]]>
It’s the beginning of Lent!

Today is Ash Wednesday, and marks for many British people the first day of Lent. Lent is the 6-week period leading up to Easter where people give up something that they love.

This could be anything from chocolate to using social media, but the idea is that you give up something that will really test you.

Traditionally, people will have cleared out their cupboards the night before in preparation for this time of fasting. This left only the essentials, such as milk, flour and eggs.

You may notice that these are the exact ingredients needed to make one of England’s favourite desserts: the pancake! This is why the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday is now better known as Pancake Day.

Two pancakes on a white plate with a splash of syrup underneath, arranged to look like a smiley face.

‘Shrove Tuesday’ and Lent

The ingredients for pancakes can be seen to symbolise four points of significance at this time of year:

  • Eggs – Creation
  • Flour – The staff of life
  • Salt – Wholesomeness
  • Milk – Purity

Shrove Tuesday is a Christian holiday, which is the largest religion in the United Kingdom. The expression comes from the word shrive, meaning “absolve”.

Historically, Shrove Tuesday, or Pancake Day, served a dual purpose. It allowed Catholics to repent of any sins they might have made before the start of Lent. In addition, it gave Christians the opportunity to engage in a last celebration before the start of Lent.

The purpose of Lent is the preparation of the believer for Easter. For Christians, Easter is characterised by making a Lenten sacrifice, fasting, praying and engaging in various spiritual disciplines.

However, ‘Pancake Day’ has become a huge event in the UK which many people partake in without being religious!

Yesterday, we made pancakes for all of our students to enjoy as part of their British cultural education.

Stephanie and Siobhan, two members of staff at Studio Cambridge, smile whilst holding a plate with a pancake topped with marshmallows. Pancakes were made to celebrate pancake day with our international English students.

You can see more pictures of our students enjoying their pancakes on our social media feed.

Pancake Racing!

On Pancake Day, pancake races take place in villages and towns across the United Kingdom.

Legend has it that the tradition originated in 1445. Apparently, a housewife from Buckinghamshire was so busy making pancakes that she forgot the time! When the church bells rang for church service, she raced out of the house still carrying her frying pan, tossing the pancake to prevent it from burning.

The pancake race still takes across the UK, especially England. Participants with frying pans race through the streets tossing pancakes into the air and catching them in the pan.

Traditionally, the pancake race in Buckinghamshire has women contestants carrying a frying pan and race over a 415-yard course. The rules are strict: contestants must toss the pancake three times and wear a scarf and apron.

Lent around the world

Other countries also celebrate Shrove Tuesday and Ash Wednesday in their own ways. In Iceland on Ash Wednesday, children pin small bags of ashes on the back of some unsuspecting person, dress up in fancy dress costumes, and sing songs for sweets.

Brazil refers to Shrove Tuesday as Mardi Gras, which literally translates to ‘Fat Tuesday’. Presumably, ‘Fat’ is because this is when people feast and party before the fasting period of Lent!

What would you give up for Lent? Is there anything don’t think you could live without? Let us know through via Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Here at Studio, we’re going to give up splitting our infinitives!

The post It’s the beginning of Lent! appeared first on Studio Cambridge.

]]>
Kindness. It costs nothing but means everything. //www.sosoele.com/kindness-it-costs-nothing-but-means-everything/ Wed, 29 Jan 2020 17:10:00 +0000 //www.sosoele.com/?p=5496 Kindness. It costs nothing but means everything. Hi there – and welcome back to #WelfareWednesday....

The post Kindness. It costs nothing but means everything. appeared first on Studio Cambridge.

]]>
Kindness. It costs nothing but means everything.

Hi there – and welcome back to #WelfareWednesday. Is it that time of the week already?

I hope you’re all having a good week so far! We certainly are at Studio. This week’s theme is kindness, as I have seen so much kindness around school. It’s heart warming to see our students taking care of our community.

Not loud, ostentatious gestures but very simple things that help someone else or make their day just that little bit brighter. I’ve seen students holding the doors open for each other, telling each other that their shoes laces are undone and moving up a space at the lunch table so that someone from another group can sit down.

Why be kind?

Kindness releases feel-good hormones. Have you ever noticed that when you do something nice for someone else, it makes you feel better too?

Research shows that doing nice things for others boosts your serotonin, the neurotransmitter responsible for feelings of satisfaction and well-being.

Like exercise, altruism also releases endorphins, a phenomenon known as a “helper’s high.” So being kind really is a win-win situation for you and the person you have been kind to.

A thank-you note for me!

One of our students from Jordan left her bag in the Common Room this week, so I brought it over to Reception and kept it safe for her to pick up the next day.

A handwritten note underneath a bar of Galaxy Vanilla Creme chocolate, reading, 'Thank you so much for finding my backpack and making it easier for me to find it. You were so kind and lovely Amy but since it's my last day I hope you accept this chocolate as a 'thanks' [doodle of heart]'.

She then left me this touching note and bar of chocolate on my desk, which I found on Monday morning. It was very small kind gesture but it meant so much to the student. Thank you again for the chocolate! And what a testament to her English learning!

Three things in human life are important. The first is to be kind. The second is to be kind. And the third is to be kind.

Henry James

I like this quote very much.

Kindness strengthens your heart physically and emotionally. Maybe that’s why they say that nice, caring people have really big hearts?

Lots of love,

Six hands of people with a variety of different skin tones coming together in the shape of a heart on a dusty pink background.

Amy

The post Kindness. It costs nothing but means everything. appeared first on Studio Cambridge.

]]>
Is singing good for you? //www.sosoele.com/is-singing-good-for-you/ Wed, 22 Jan 2020 16:44:32 +0000 //www.sosoele.com/?p=5482 Is singing good for you? Welcome to #WelfareWednesday, where I’m going to be talking about...

The post Is singing good for you? appeared first on Studio Cambridge.

]]>
Is singing good for you?

Welcome to #WelfareWednesday, where I’m going to be talking about the things we do at Studio Cambridge to ensure our students are their happiest! You may have caught some of my previous posts on our social media – I’m Amy, Head of Welfare, and I’m in charge of promoting the social and friendly atmosphere amongst our students here at Studio.

What have we been getting up to?

There’s been a fantastic buzz around school and singing really does seem to have been a highlight of the week, so that’s what we’re thinking about today. Our students from Brazil enjoyed a Team Quiz last night at school, followed by some excellent karaoke in Café Studio. The atmosphere was outstanding as everyone was having so much fun, meeting new people and learning new English song lyrics.

Reception has also seen Gabriel from the IST Group singing a beautiful song during break time, followed by Gemma from the Sales Team singing her version of “You’ve got a friend” (originally sung by James Taylor). Both voices were stunning and resonated wonderfully through the offices and classroom around Reception. Students and staff eagerly popped out to listen.

Gemma Armel from the Sutdio Cambridge Sales Team sings a duet with one of our group students.

Singing is very good for you because it raises endorphins, puts a smile on your face and encourages good posture!

Gemma

We’re also holding a Latino Disco on Thursday this week which is sure to be another great opportunity for students to sing and dance together!

Benefits of Singing:

There are numerous benefits to singing. For example, it helps release endorphins, the feel-good chemicals in the brain. Research from the University of Frankfurt suggests that singing also boosts the immune system. Further, it is also known that people who sing in groups might feel a lift from their social connection and may feel happier. The Alzheimer’s Society recognises this and has even established their own ‘Singing for the Brain’ service!

We hope you have a fantastic rest of the week and remember to keep singing – it might even reinforce your English vocabulary. Have a look at Gemma and Gabriel singing in reception in the video below.

Lots of love,

Amy x

The post Is singing good for you? appeared first on Studio Cambridge.

]]>
Studio Cambridge students attend Cambridge University lectures //www.sosoele.com/studio-cambridge-students-attend-cambridge-university-lectures/ Mon, 05 Aug 2019 08:00:30 +0000 //www.studiocambridge.local/?p=607 Studio Cambridge’s Sir Christopher and Sir Laurence summer camps offer students the opportunity to explore Cambridge University life. Cambridge University Discovery Theme...

The post Studio Cambridge students attend Cambridge University lectures appeared first on Studio Cambridge.

]]>
Studio Cambridge’s Sir Christopher and Sir Laurence summer camps offer students the opportunity to explore Cambridge University life. Cambridge University Discovery Theme includes lessons and activities as well as a series of University academic lectures on a variety of topics. 

This year’s series of lectures started with Dr. Ljiljana Fruk presenting the link between chemistry and emotions in the “Molecules in (E)motion” lecture. The “Future is Already Here: Science has met the Science Fiction” lecture explored how science fiction is helping us imagine and understand scientific discoveries through art and literature.

Science Communicator Ginny Smith’s “Hack your Brain” lecture introduced students to the workings of the brain and nervous system by creating a giant ‘neuron’ live on stage. Her second lecture, “Can you believe your brain?”, will ask if we can trust what we see and hear using live demos, illusions and experiments.

The lectures take place at the University of Cambridge Department of Engineering and the topics are presented in a visual and interactive format.

The post Studio Cambridge students attend Cambridge University lectures appeared first on Studio Cambridge.

]]>
What’s on in Cambridge in June //www.sosoele.com/whats-on-in-cambridge-in-june/ Thu, 30 May 2019 08:00:32 +0000 //www.studiocambridge.local/?p=608 What’s on in Cambridge in June So you’ve decided to study English in Cambridge this summer- an...

The post What’s on in Cambridge in June appeared first on Studio Cambridge.

]]>
What’s on in Cambridge in June

So you’ve decided to study English in Cambridge this summer- an excellent choice! Cambridge is a beautiful city, with a rich history and a vibrant, diverse student population. Summer is a great time to relax in Cambridge parks, cycle along the River Cam, go punting or just walk around the old city centre. It’s also a busy season, with live performances, music gigs, festivals and all kinds of fun events in Cambridge’s open spaces- just remember to check the weather before you go out! Here are some of the events happening in Cambridge in June.

Jazz and Brass in the Parks

Jazz and Brass in the Parks is a free event taking place in some of Cambridge’s beautiful parks. Think of it as a jazz-funk-latin celebration of music and fun. Just bring your picnic and your friends and enjoy. 
When: Selected Sundays from June to September, 3pm – 5pm
Where: various Cambridge parks

Cambridge Strawberry Fair

Cambridge Strawberry Fair is one of Cambridge’s most popular festivals of music, entertainment and art, taking place on the first Saturday of June. It’s free, run by volunteers and has been held in Cambridge since 1974. This year’s theme is Love- something we all need! 
When: Saturday 1st June, 12pm – 11pm
Where: Midsummer Common

Cambridge Chinese Dragon Boat Festival

Fancy a taste of Asia? Head to Jesus Green Park for the Cambridge Chinese Dragon Boat Festival, the biggest free-entry Chinese cultural event in Cambridgeshire. Dragon boat race, fun and food stalls.
When: Sunday 2nd June, 9:30am – 5pm
Where: Jesus Green

Cambridge Pride

First ever Cambridge Pride takes place this month to celebrate Cambridgeshire’s diversity. It’s also UK’s first Pride river parade. It’s a free event with live music, performances by local artists, food vans and, of course, a pride parade. 
When: Saturday 8th June, 12pm – 10pm
Where:  Jesus Green 

Cambridge Town & Country Fair

Cambridge Town & Country Fair is a popular family event taking place at the heart of Cambridge. Now in its 13th year, this free event has it all, from arts and crafts to food stalls and fun for everyone. 
When: Saturday 8th & Sunday 9th June, 10am – 5pm
Where: Parker’s Piece

May Bumps

It’s time for May Bumps, the world’s largest intra-university sporting competition, in which thousands of Cambridge University students take part every year. Best places to watch and have fun include The Plough pub in Fen Ditton and the Grassy Corner. Learn more about this Cambridge tradition here.
When: Wednesday 12th June to Saturday 15th June 
Where: River Cam

Strawberries & Creem Festival

Strawberries & Creem is one of Cambridge’s biggest music events and one of the UK’s most exciting young festivals. Now in its 5th year, the festival features 40+ artists across 3 stages, food and drinks- and promises lots of dance and fun.
When: Saturday 15th June, 12pm
Where: Haggis Farm

Foodies Festival

If you’re a foodie, don’t miss out on the Foodies Festival this month. One of UK’s biggest food festivals is coming to Cambridge with top chefs, masterclasses, live music, sweet treats by Bake Off winners and delicious food from around the world.
When: Friday 28th June to Sunday 30th June
Where: Parker’s Piece

The post What’s on in Cambridge in June appeared first on Studio Cambridge.

]]>
Remembering Chris Roberts, Studio’s owner for 25 years //www.sosoele.com/remembering-chris-roberts-studios-owner-for-25-years/ Fri, 15 Feb 2019 09:00:35 +0000 //www.studiocambridge.local/?p=609 Remembering Christopher Roberts 1942 – 2019 We are sad to announce that Christopher Roberts, the...

The post Remembering Chris Roberts, Studio’s owner for 25 years appeared first on Studio Cambridge.

]]>
Remembering Christopher Roberts

1942 – 2019

Chris Roberts in 2004

We are sad to announce that Christopher Roberts, the former owner of Studio Cambridge, died in February 2019, aged 76. It was while holidaying in New Zealand that Chris suffered a sudden heart attack. He leaves behind him friends from all over the world and he will be missed by all who worked with him and knew him.

He had over 40 years in the industry, playing a big part in keeping Cambridge at the forefront of  Engish language teaching in the UK.

A student of Marlborough College, Chris started his EFL career in VSO in the 1960s, teaching children in Papua New Guinea. He came to the Studio School of English in Cambridge in 1972 and spent the rest of his working life here.

In true Studio fashion, he climbed up through the ranks, starting as an English teacher, then Director of Studies, Vice Principal and then Principal. Eventually, in 1993 he bought the school and remained our sole owner for 25 years.

As owner, he serverd on the ARELS council (now English UK) in the 90’s. Soon after, he changed the Company’s name to “Studio Cambridge” to reflect our expanding portfolio of summer camp provision for children and teenagers.

In 2004, Chris retired from the day-to-day running of the business and took the title of Chairman. In September 2018 he finally sold the company to Full Circle Education Group.

Danny Wang, the Managing Director of Full Circle said “During the purchase of Studio, Chris was always most concerned about the people that he was leaving behind at the school and the legacy of Studio Cambridge in the future. All of us at Studio owe him an enormous debt and at Full Circle we honour his contribution and his memory.”

The post Remembering Chris Roberts, Studio’s owner for 25 years appeared first on Studio Cambridge.

]]>
10 reasons to choose Cambridge for your English study abroad //www.sosoele.com/10-reasons-to-choose-cambridge-for-your-english-study-abroad/ Tue, 18 Dec 2018 09:00:35 +0000 //www.studiocambridge.local/?p=641 So you’ve made the decision to study English in England – congratulations! That’s a wise...

The post 10 reasons to choose Cambridge for your English study abroad appeared first on Studio Cambridge.

]]>
So you’ve made the decision to study English in England – congratulations! That’s a wise choice and an experience you’ll never forget. But where do you go? Which city do you choose as the best location to speak English, study English and practice English? London with its regal history? Brighton with its beaches? Oxford with its spires? Or what about studying English in Cambridge? What does Cambridge have to offer an international student?

Here are the top 10 reasons why Cambridge is the perfect location for you to study English if you haven’t yet made up your mind.

Bridge of Sighs Cambridge
Cambridge city centre Grand Arcade

1. The diverse mix of students
Cambridge is a young peoples’ city. As well as international English language students, we have approximately 20,000 University students studying every year across all of the colleges, in over 65 different subjects. Around 12% are international students, so you’ll be sharing the city with other students from all over the globe, of different ages and backgrounds. During the summer months when university students take a break (or come to work at Studio!), the number of international students here to learn English increases, so walking around the city you’ll hear plenty more languages than just English, and will make friends from many different places.

2. The History and The University
Cambridge University is the fourth-oldest surviving university in the world, with over 800 years of excellence, and 31 different colleges. It is consistently ranked in the top 3 universities of the world and has an endless list of famous students, including over 100 Nobel Prize winners and 15 British Prime Ministers.  Even before the university Cambridge has a rich history that dates back to the Bronze Age. The Romans, Saxons, Vikings and Normans settled here, and it became an important trading centre, with the river Cam being used to trade goods up and down the country.

3. King’s College Chapel
One of the most famous of all of the colleges in Cambridge is King’s, and its chapel which dominates the city centre. It was built over a period of nearly 100 years, and visitors can walk around and take in the amazing stained glass windows and paintings. You can even listen to the renowned chapel choir who perform their special service of Evensong, as well as the service of ‘Nine Lessons and Christmas Carols’ that has been performed every Christmas Eve since 1918.

4. Punting
‘Punts’ are the names given to pleasure boats with a flat-bottom that are made entirely of wood. They were originally designed as cargo boats, however they are now purely used for the pleasure of tourists and locals alike. By far the most popular pastime, especially in the summer, you can either punt yourself (by using a pole to push yourself and your passengers along the river) or be punted by a professional guide, who will tell stories and interesting facts as you pass under centuries-old bridges, past colleges, and other buildings only visible from the river.

Punting on the River cam

5. The old city centre
Cambridge city centre is unlike any other you would find in the country, due to most of the buildings (including shops and restaurants) being owned by the university. This means the appearance has changed very little in the past 800 years since it was founded. Sure, there are modern shopping centres with lots of High Street stores and independent retailers, however the small streets that you pass through and walk on, are the exact same stones and cobbles that famous scholars such as Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin and Lord Byron would have stepped on; you’re literally walking in the footsteps of giants!

6. Food and Drink
Many people believe that English people only eat junk food and ‘chips with everything’. The reality however is that due to the multicultural society, especially in Cambridge, the people have become accustomed to eating and enjoying dishes from all over the world, so every style of cuisine is present,  whether you choose fine dining or a quick bite to eat on-the-go. Fancy a Lebanese barbecue cooked over hot coals? A fusion of Japanese and Danish sushi? Or simply a traditional Italian gelato? It’s all here. If you do fancy seeing what the ‘Best of British’ has to offer, there are plenty of cosy pubs where you can sit by an open fire and have a crusty meat pie or battered fish with er…chips!

7. Studio Cambridge
Cambridge is one of the UK’s most popular cities for language students, and the city has a large number of language schools to choose from. So why choose Studio Cambridge? Well, as well as being the oldest in Cambridge (65 years old in 2019) Studio has a wealth of experience in teaching individuals and groups of students from beginner to proficiency level. You also get a free social programme included to make sure that your stay is as action-packed and enjoyable as possible. Everybody here – directors, teachers, welfare or accommodation staff – want you to do well and come away with a positive experience, so we go that extra distance to ensure that you succeed and make some of the best memories that you’ll remember for the rest of your life. 

Studio Cambridge language school

8. Location and Transport
Cambridge is situated in the South-East of England. It is approximately 50km North of London, which is less than an hour away by train. The climate is generally dry and mild, however it can also have very hot summers and very cold winters! Cambridge can be reached by public transport or taxi from all the London airports in less than 3 hours, and you can be at the seaside on the South coast or at a castle in the North of England in around the same time. Once in Cambridge itself you can walk the whole of the city centre very easily, however if you did wish to explore a bit further, then you could always hire a bicycle to get around. Cambridge is one of Europe’s most cycle-friendly cities, and in fact over 50% of the people living here use a bike at least once a week. It’s the perfect way to have that extra bit of independence!

9. Sport and Leisure
When you associate Cambridge with sport you may possibly think about the famous annual ‘Boat Race’ between students of Cambridge and Oxford, which has been held on the River Thames in London since 1829. But did you also know that the city is the birthplace of the laws of football, which were the foundations of the association rules that we play by today? Sport is an important part of everyday life in Cambridge, and the many parks and recreational areas see people from all over the world playing together for fun; it’s a great way to meet new people. As well as the important sporting history, Cambridge also has 3 swimming pools including a 1920s lido pool that is 91 metres long, a bowling alley and many different gyms which offer short term student membership.

10. The Museums and Culture
If sport isn’t necessarily your thing then there are still a lot of interesting places to visit during your free time, including 18 different museums; many of which are free to enter. The most famous of these museums is the Fitzwilliam, which was founded in 1816 and houses the university’s collection of arts and antiquities, including a large number of artefacts from ancient Egypt, and paintings from some of the world’s most famous impressionists. As well as visiting a few museums, in an afternoon you could also go up the 123 steps of the tower of Great St Mary’s church which offers the best views of Cambridge, or even take a stroll through the Grantchester Meadows to take tea in ‘The Orchard’, arguably the world’s most famous teagarden.

Cambridge City centre from the Tower

The post 10 reasons to choose Cambridge for your English study abroad appeared first on Studio Cambridge.

]]>